Matt Green appointed as lead artist for the East Leeds Pavilion research and development

The East Leeds Project and Bauman Lyons Architects advance their ambition to co-create the East Leeds Pavilion, the first ever Maker Space in east Leeds, with the help of artist Matt Green, local residents and makers, and funding from Arts Council England.

Visual arts organisation the East Leeds Project [ELP] is delighted to announce that Leeds-based Matt Green, who was selected from a national open submission, has been appointed as Lead Artist on the next phase of the East Leeds Pavilion project. The project seeks to realise the first dedicated Maker Space in East Leeds, partially closing a gap in provision left by the near total absence of creative workspaces across inner and outer east Leeds, which has a population of over 180,000.

The Maker Space will be co-created and co-owned by, with and for people in east Leeds, providing access to space, equipment and knowledge for experienced Makers and beginners alike. The project will make use of MassBespoke, an innovative and sustainable digital system for modular construction devised by Leeds-based architectural practice Bauman Lyons. MassBespoke aims to democratise the design and build process for self-builders and communities. Local authority-owned land at Fearnville Fields in Gipton has been identified as the preferred site for the Pavilion.

The project already has support from Leeds2023, but the funding of £21,740 recently secured from Arts Council England creates capacity for a focused period of Research and Development from November 2019, including embedding a Lead Artist in the process. Matt Green will work with the Project Team, which comprises the East Leeds Project, local residents, Artists and Makers and Bauman Lyons staff over the next 10 months, creatively testing the technology, shaping the vision for the Pavilion, and ensuring that creative voices remain at the project’s heart.

Matt Green said, ‘I’m very happy to be working with the East Leeds Project on the research and development of the East Leeds Pavilion. Over the next ten months, through social and site-specific practice, I look forward to getting to know Gipton and east Leeds. My intention is to utilise my skills with digital technologies to provide engaging platforms for local people to share their knowledge and thoughts about the local area, and collaborate with the East Leeds Project team on designs for the area’s future. The outcomes of this activity will be brought together in an artwork that recounts the histories, perspectives and ideas shared, which I hope will enthuse a wider public, and through such, initiate further action to benefit Gipton and east Leeds’.

Kerry Harker and Claire Irving, Directors of the East Leeds Project, said, ‘We are all delighted to be working with Matt on the next phase of this ambitious but much-needed project to ensure that people in east Leeds have access to a dedicated space for Making, and where social and creative networks can be nurtured. The interview panel were immediately drawn to Matt’s enthusiasm for the project’s aims and excited by the potential for his practice as an artist working with sound and digital technologies to reveal and amplify as yet unanticipated aspects of the project and the MassBespoke system’.

Irena Bauman, Director of Bauman Lyons architects added, ‘we are looking forward to the creativity and the new ways of seeing that Matt will bring into the rich mix of local skills and cultural activism and the delivery of practical outcomes at the end of this exploration phase.

There will be opportunities for the wider public and partners to get involved across the 10 month R&D period, with more news on these events to be released in the New Year.

Matt Green

Matt is a producer of site-specific art: artwork that is conceived for a specific space, in response to a specific social and environmental context, and takes into account the cultural, historic and political significance of the hosting site. Each work is the outcome of an extensive programme of situated activity that includes audio-visual documentary; community collaboration; and onsite research, design and development.

As is expected of site-specific practice, the theme of each of Matt’s artworks is drawn from the conditions of the locations this work regards. However, a common theme has been the correspondence between, and often friction between, cities and nature. Furthermore, soundscapes, listening and place have tended to be a focus of Matt’s work, reflecting his education and experience as a musician and sound designer.

The form of Matt’s artwork varies but common to all forms is the application of digital technologies. Matt has produced soundscape compositions, multichannel sound installations, short films, video installations, interactive installations, mobile applications, VR experiences, live multimedia performances and workshop events. He has also shown work at various festivals and conferences throughout the UK and further afield including Dislocate (Tokyo, Japan), Medialab-Prado (Madrid, Spain) and FutureEverything (Manchester, UK).

www.mgreensound.com

Are you coming to the East Leeds Makers Social?

The East Leeds Makers Social

4pm-7pm, Thursday 27th June 2019

Upstairs at Gipton Methodist Church*

Makers of all kinds across east Leeds are invited to our first East Leeds Makers Social on 27 June. We’ve commissioned Bradford-based artist Andy Abbott to create a new participatory project about ‘making’ for this year’s Gipton Gala, funded by Leeds Inspired. Andy’s project builds on our ‘East Leeds Makers’ research project and survey, and we’d love to get people based in east Leeds involved.

 

Artist Andy Abbott talks about the East Leeds Makers Social.


Whether you’re an artist, designer, craftsperson, gardener, baker, or a maker of anything else, come along to our Social where you’ll be able to:

  • Meet and find out more about other makers based in east Leeds
  • Showcase and share skills
  • Have your handiwork 3D scanned and added to our makers archive – bring something you’ve made with you!
  • Find out more about the ‘What Makes Gipton?’ showcase at Gipton Gala and our plans for the East Leeds Pavilion maker space
East-Leeds-Project-3D-Scan
Artist Alexandra Francis 3D scan an item for the Makers Archive.

 

 

Everyone’s welcome – drop in any time between 4 and 7pm. The event is free to attend and refreshments will be served. We’d love to meet you!

For more info please email Kerry Harker at kerry@eastleedsproject.org

Andy Abbott is an artist, musician, writer and arts organiser living and working in West Yorkshire. He has exhibited and performed internationally as an individual artist and in various collaborations including the art collective Black Dogs. Recent projects include a participatory map looking at Bradford Common Spaces for the National Science and Media Museum, and a Virtual Reality video game set in Luton for the town’s Pilot Year of Culture. www.andyabbott.co.uk

* We are sorry that there is no lift access to the first floor of the Church. Please contact us to discuss any access requirements.

Blog: Are you a Secret Maker?

Considering Making and Makers for the East Leeds Makers survey

It’s a mixed weather Sunday in mid March, and I have just emerged from an hour-long bath. My neighbours trees now just tap lightly on the bathroom window, as opposed to the past few days where, thanks to storms Gareth and Hannah they have battered, with a sense of unusual urgency, upon the side of the house, as if sending a tree morse code.

Batten down the hatches, the winds are here.

The dulcet sound of James Shakeshaft (a Leeds musician, a maker of music) wafts up the stairs, as I contemplate what it is to be a maker.

Engraver - Wood working

My initial thoughts are; we are all makers. From the moment we wake up, we are making decisions. When to get up, what to wear, when to leave the house, or indeed whether to stay. We make our beds, (well, not all of us but let’s not get distracted here) we make breakfast, lunch, tea, dinner, supper, a snack, a cuppa.

We collectively make a community come together, or separate. We collectively make decisions as to whom we might honour with speaking on our behalf, and, similarly, many make the decision to abstain from the debate. We make our way in the world.

Making is inherent in our language as something we do.

However, when asked, “Are you a maker?” so many people immediately translate that as something ‘other people do’.

So what if we take the dictionary explanation of making: a person or thing that makes or produces something.

Does this change our perception of what a maker is?

Perhaps we don’t acknowledge that a large part of our daily lives is a creative process? Perhaps a maker is a person or thing that makes or produces something, which in itself, is not necessary for survival?

Perhaps it is because we are not taught to relish something that doesn’t turn out as well as we’d planned in our heads?

The sewing machine and item of clothing

So here are a few maker myths debunked…

  • An artist is not necessarily just someone who can paint.
  • A musician is not only someone who can play an instrument.
  • A singer is not someone defined by whether they can sing in tune.
  • A writer is not exclusively someone who has had a piece of work published.
  • A craftsperson is not confined to someone who sews, knits, welds, saws or attaches things together.

Yes, they are all makers, but they have learnt by trial and error, by giving it a go, by stepping outside their comfort zone, by hanging out with others and sharing knowledge. There are no right or wrongs in the world of making, which is why so many of us make things just for the sheer delight of doing so.

However, confidence, accessibility, encouragement and dedication can often be the elements separating those who do, from those who believe they can’t.

Whatever you think a maker is, of this you can be sure, there is nothing more pleasing than standing back and looking upon something you have made just because you wanted to, and enjoying your creation, flaws and all.

And whilst I still believe that we are all makers in one form or another, there are only some of us that do it to satisfy a creative urge that goes beyond the day to day.

Creativity is inherent in us all, whether we choose to take it to another level is completely the choice of the individual, but there is room for us all to follow our dreams, make mistakes, pick ourselves up, and start again.

Right, I’m of to make a cup of tea…

Claire Irving
Communities Director
East Leeds Project

P.S. If you are a Maker – please have a look at our survey below – it’ll only take a couple of minutes!

 

ELM-logo

The East Leeds Makers survey is now live and will gather data over the next couple of months, with the intention of publishing our research in the summer of 2019. Please go to the survey by clicking the link below:

COMPLETE THE EAST LEEDS MAKERS ONLINE SURVEY

News: Gipton Gala Commission

Artists commission opportunity now live

We are delighted to announce that the East Leeds Project has been awarded funding through Leeds Inspired to commission an artist or artists to create a new piece of work for the Gipton Gala 2019, which will take place at Fearnville Fields on 14 July. We are now inviting proposals on the theme of ‘making.’

Gipton Gala Artists Brief

Artists at any stage of their career, working individually or collectively, are invited to apply. Please download full details of the commission above.

Submit through CuratorSpace

All enquiries and submissions should be made through CuratorSpace, where the commission details are also available, on the link above.

The deadline for submissions is midnight on Friday 26 April.

The commission forms part of an extended period of R&D informing our ambition to create a Pavilion at Fearnville Fields, as a temporary maker space, in partnership with Bauman Lyons Architects and utilising their innovative system MassBespoke.

The East Leeds Project would like to thank Leeds Inspired for their support.

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Photo of Feanville Fields: Courtesy of Flexi-Funding.co.uk

Blog: Mapping East Leeds

By Katie Raw, University of Leeds Undergraduate studying Human Geography.

I became involved with the East Leeds Project after connecting with its Directors. Having discussed how my background in social geography could further the ambitions of the organisation, I was thrilled to have the opportunity to put my skills into practice as part of an important cultural project in an area with little cultural infrastructure.

Academically, my interests centre around cultural and social geography, and particularly the socio-cultural elements of interactions and space. I am also a creative practitioner and have been heavily involved in dance throughout my life.

Throughout my Human Geography degree, I have undertaken a number of spatial mapping activities. With the University of Leeds known as the pioneers of spatial analysis research, Leeds’ human geography graduates are nationally recognised for their strength in this field. I have been lucky enough to work with some amazing professors, some of who even built the programmes that I am using today!

Previous projects using GIS (Geographical Information Systems – programmes for spatial analysis research) were centred on the retail sector. Last year, I tested the viability of a new out-of-town development for a major Grocery brand by mapping local geodemographic information, as well as supply and demand data. Now, I am mapping stores in the local area using a variety of data sources to determine how the client can improve market share.

As well as finding mapping and quantitative analysis a challenging yet rewarding proposition, my strength in the study of human geography also concerns social and cultural areas, including migration. The subject of my final year dissertation is an exploration of the emergence of a recreational drug culture across the student population.

East Leeds Makers is part of a Workplace Cooperative Project Module as part of my degree. As well as being motivated by the opportunity to apply academic, research-based theories in an area previously unexplored, I am also excited on a personal level by the prospect of meeting new communities in the city and collecting qualitative data through face-to-face interviews and as well as through an online and paper survey.

At the time of writing, the project has just kicked off, with interviews with residents of East Leeds. Early findings are already outlining the issues at play – a lack of spaces in which to work, meet and share, a lack of opportunities, support and a sense of isolation from activities taking place in other areas of the city.

But it is evident what East Leeds does not lack – creative spark – we’ve already had discussions with artists, graphic designers and film makers as well as people engaged in crafts like woodwork, clothes making and designing greetings cards.

So, watch this space – the East Leeds Makers mapping project is up and running. If you haven’t had the opportunity already, we would be grateful if you could participate and allow us to successfully complete our project, before we publish our findings in the summer of 2019.

Katie Raw
East Leeds Project
Undergraduate Placement from the University of Leeds

 

ELM-logo

The research project is now live and will gather data over the next few months, with the intention of publishing our research in the summer of 2019. Please go to the survey by clicking the link below:

COMPLETE THE EAST LEEDS MAKERS ONLINE SURVEY